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Beach huts.

Beach huts.

Weymouth is a lovely place and I had the pleasure of visiting the town in the run up to the 2012 London Olympics [Weymouth being the venue for the sailing events]. This photograph of some beach huts was my first on that day, but my dear friend Mr. W and I had started our walk much further up the seafront and we park the car either further away from the centre of Weymouth than that.

Bunting.

Bunting.

Our first sighting of celebratory bunting occurred a short walk further from the beach huts, on the front of some guest houses that must have boasted quite impressive views of the beach. Further up the promenade again, the bunting was joined by banners with messages like “Inspiring A Generation” (one of which I photograph next to Weymouth’s Jubilee clock).

Weymouth's Jubilee Clock - erected in 1887 to mark 50th years of Queen Victoria's reign.

Weymouth’s Jubilee Clock – erected in 1887 to mark 50th years of Queen Victoria’s reign.

Our walk along the promenade took a turn inland as I got distracted by a very impressive statue of King George III flanked by palm trees. I was delighted to find out that George III also enjoyed holidaying on the Dorset coast and showed a liking for Weymouth, to the extent that he bought a holiday home there! [You can read more about George III and Weymouth here]

Now distracted by a side street we headed into the hustle and bustle of the town.

Eventually we navigated our way to the harbour; passed “The Ship Inn” where I had a very enjoyable tea, or a late dinner, the year before.

King George III.

King George III.

Don’t neglect the harbour in favour of the beach if you are visiting Weymouth this Summer. The harbour is a hive of activity, with the fishermen on one side, and a sense of fun, with pleasure craft of all sizes plying to and fro.

Here are some of my favourite photographs:

"The Ship Inn" - I recommend the fish.

“The Ship Inn” – I recommend the fish.

WH.

WH.

A view from the bridge spanning the Harbour.

A view from the bridge spanning the Harbour.

Crossing the Harbour in a rowing boat (note the Olympic bunting).

Crossing the Harbour in a rowing boat (note the Olympic bunting).

We walked along the harbour side and then along a pier dotted with anglers. After taking in the view (and resting our feet) we headed up to take in the view from the Nothe Fort, a Victorian coastal artillery position, which is open to the public. Naturally, the Nothe has the best views of both Weymouth on one side and Portland on the other and I do believe they used it during Olympics to observe the sailing events on the Weymouth .

Weymouth.

A view of the harbour mouth.

After a Pint of bitter by the Harbour we headed back to the promenade and the beach, a voiding the narrow streets of the town this time.

We had a refreshing Pint in this pub on our walk back.

We had a refreshing Pint in this pub on our walk back.

It was only then, after hours of walking on one of the sunniest days of that Summer, I realised I had failed to put any sun cream on the back of my legs and that they were red like lobsters! I still enjoyed the walk back along the beach though, despite this painful realisation. My last vivid memory of Weymouth is of a delightful helter-skelter, so I am going to leave you with a photograph of that. I hope if you visit Weymouth you enjoy it as much as I did.

Whenever the London 2012 Olympic Games are mentioned I always remember our medal winners, the Golds (medals, the post boxes and Luke Campbell’s gold telephone box) and… Weymouth.

CNV00041

“We all like to be beside the seaside”.

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